Businesswoman grows vegetables in shipping containers in Nigerian capital

businesswoamn.nigeria

ANA / Maxwell Hall of the World Economic Forum interviews Oluwayimika Angel Adelaja, founder and CEO of Fresh Direct Produce and Agro-Allied Services at WEF Africa 2017 in Durban.

Meet The New Way To Farm!

This young Nigerian, a winner of the World Economic Forum’s Top Women Innovators Award, has turned adversity and a modern city’s hunger for imported vegetables into a thriving business.

In this age of Eat Local campaigns, one might be a little alarmed to encounter vegetables called rucola, petite-this and mange-that, on a plate in the Nigerian capital, but fear not, Oluwayimika Angel Adelaja told a briefing at the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Africa meetings on Friday, these micro greens are not just grown near Abuja, they are grown within the teeming metropolis.

This young Nigerian, a winner of the World Economic Forum’s Top Women Innovators Award, has turned adversity and a modern city’s hunger for imported vegetables into a thriving business. Her business is growing micro greens in shipping containers in town, allowing her to add “hyper local” to the tag.

The founder and chief executive of Fresh Direct Produce and Agro-Allied Services in Nigeria said her business started with a regular farm, but making a success of that proved so challenging that she was forced to innovate.

How did it all Start?

The business started with 10 greenhouses on a leased 300 hectare farm. The green houses took up only a small part of the land, with the rest covered with trees. Beside the cost of clearing, which would have been exorbitant, Angel said, she had a problem with the idea of displacing forest.

An additional problem was that the farm was three hours from market

As any farmer will confirm, this business is not for the faint-hearted. Angel told the briefing on the last day of the WEF Africa meetings in Durban that small farmers like herself could expect to lose up to 50 percent of their crop before harvest. Lack of funds compounds problems around a shortage of information and lack of inputs and tools.

Access to finance would be a game changer for farmers, but bank loans are usually available only to landowners in Nigeria.

“First I need to be rich before I can get a loan,” Angel said.

Transporting often-delicate, perishable goods along bad roads and a lack of storage facilities added to problems which meant that, she added, another 25 percent of produce could be lost from farm to market.

Another challenge that forced a rethink of the business was when the fuel price increased from 87 Naira a litre to above 200 Naira in a short period of time.

It was these and other challenges that forced Fresh Direct to innovate and “pivot”, as she described it, and develop their genius plan to grow vegetables in town. The business now grows micro greens in containers stacked five high at two sites in Abuja.

Each 20-foot shipping container would fit a car – instead they take 4 000 plants per cycle, with a cycle lasting from seven days to a month.

The vegetables are produced using a hydroponic method where plants are grown in nutrient-filled water, rather than soil. The business is moving into aquaponics too, where fish are added to the system to enhance the cycle.

This is a long way away from fast food, but the vegetables can be delivered to customers 15 minutes after they are harvested and washed.

Fresh Direct’s customers are restaurants, hotels and grocery stores. “The nice thing with corporate customers is that they are consistent,” Angel said.

An outlet in Lagos will soon be added to the two already operating in Abuja. In Lagos, Angel said she expects to tap into an ever bigger demand for micro greens, niche foods that are a favourite of modern chefs, foodies and other hipster types.

Fresh Direct currently employs 10 people full-time and another 59 part-time, many of whom would find it hard to secure good jobs elsewhere. Angel told the WEF briefing that not one of her staff had gone to secondary school and just one has previous agricultural experience.

She said her staff call themselves “tech farmers” in a country where farming is sometimes looked down on as a less-than-dignified career.

Angel clearly doesn’t look down on traditional farming. In fact, she seemed pleased and relieved to say that doing the fancy vegetables, rather than staple foods, meant she was not competing with traditional rural farmers, rather they are providing vegetables that are otherwise imported.

Source: http://clubofmozambique.com/news/businesswoman-grows-vegetables-in-shipping-containers-in-nigerian-capital/

 

Herbed Hummus

This year, revamp party food with recipes that make it easy to have the gang over and keep your resolutions intact. Jazz up purchased hummus with a combination of fresh herbs that add bright flavor to this green dip.Recipe: Herbed Hummus

This year, revamp party food with recipes that make it easy to have the gang over and keep your resolutions intact. Jazz up purchased hummus with a combination of fresh herbs that add bright flavor to this green dip.

LEVEL: EASY
SERVES: 8

INGREDIENTS

  • 16 oz. store-bought plain hummus
  • 1 c. roughly chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as parsley, chives, cilantro, and dill

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a food processor, combine hummus and herbs; process until herbs are finely chopped, about 1 minute.

Butternut-Kale Frittata

Active Time:
10 Mins
Total Time:
10 Mins
Yield
Serves 1 (serving size: 1 frittata)

Frittatas are one of the most efficient vehicles for leftover vegetables. Here, we pair roasted butternut squash with quick-cooking kale for a fiber-rich breakfast duo. A touch of dairy lends creaminess to the egg mixture, which helps achieve the coveted custardy frittata texture. For best results, use a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet and pull it from the oven before the eggs are completely set. Because it retains heat well, a cast-iron will continue to cook your frittata after you remove it from the oven. Continue reading “Butternut-Kale Frittata”

Peppermint Fudge No Bake Energy Bites

Peppermint Fudge No Bake Energy Bites Recipe - healthy festive bites of chocolate fun!/ Running in a Skirt
Prep time: 10 mins
Total time: 10 mins
 Serves: 9 bites
Ingredients
  • ½ cup cup raw almonds
  • ⅓ cup pitted medjool dates (about 6)
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ⅛ teaspoon peppermint extract
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon mini dark chocolate chips
  • ½ cup crushed peppermint Continue reading “Peppermint Fudge No Bake Energy Bites”

Make Healthy Mashed Potatoes With This One Kitchen Tool

If you’re like us, mashed potatoes might be your personal favorite part of the Thanksgiving meal. (And if you’re vegetarian or vegan, mashed potatoes probably are your Thanksgiving meal).

But, this hero side dish has a dark side that’s quite a mouthful. Potatoes are loaded with high glycemic-index carbohydrates, which means they’re quickly digested into sugars that rapidly raise blood-sugar levels.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing for non-diabetic folks, especially when they’re eaten in moderation as part of a healthy, vegetable-rich diet. Plus, potatoes are actually pretty low in calories, around 150. Continue reading “Make Healthy Mashed Potatoes With This One Kitchen Tool”

Healthy Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars

These pumpkin cheesecake bars are gluten free and so creamy, that you’d never know they’re secretly healthy, naturally sweetened and only 150 calories!

Ingredients

For the crust

    • Tbsp Pure maple syrup
    • Tbsp Molasses
    • 1/3 Cup Coconut oil, at room temperature (it should be the consistency of softened butter)
    • 3/4 Cup Coconut flour, sifted (66g)
    • 1/4 tsp Ginger powder
    • Pinch of salt

Continue reading “Healthy Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars”

Butternut-Cauliflower-Coconut Curry

Butternut-Cauliflower Coconut Curry

A range of textures—crunchy peas, tender vegetables, and silky coconut broth—makes this cool-weather main incredibly satisfying. The chickpea mixture can also be a delicious gluten-free snack: After baking, toss with a little kosher salt, ground cumin, and ground red pepper. Store in an airtight container for three days. To speed up prep, look for pre-cut cauliflower florets in your grocery store’s produce section. Even if you have to prep the cauliflower and cut your own florets, you will only add about five minutes to a 40-minute meatless main. Continue reading “Butternut-Cauliflower-Coconut Curry”

Coconut Roasted Cauliflower with Cilantro and Lime

Fat florets of cauliflower stay meaty when roasted—you could even try this with orange or yellow cauliflower. If you happen to have pickled chiles, use them in place of the fresh chiles here.

Coconut Roasted Cauliflower with Cilantro and Lime

    • 1 head cauliflower, leaves discarded, bottom trimmed
    • 1 tablespoon coconut oil, warmed just until liquid
    • Jacobsen flake finishing sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 tablespoons ground coriander
    • ½ red finger chile, sliced
    • ½ lime
    • Cilantro sprigs

Continue reading “Coconut Roasted Cauliflower with Cilantro and Lime”