Study: Marijuana Decriminalization Leads To Decreased Arrests, No Increase In Youth Use

Marijuana Decriminalization

St. Louis, MO: State laws reducing minor marijuana possession offenses from criminal to civil violations (aka decriminalization) are associated with dramatic reductions in drug-related arrests, and are not linked to any uptick in youth cannabis use, according to data published by researchers affiliated with Washington University and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Investigators examined the impact of cannabis decriminalization on arrests and youth cannabis use in five states that passed decriminalization measures between the years 2008 and 2014: Massachusetts (decriminalized in 2008), Connecticut (2011), Rhode Island (2013), Vermont (2013), and Maryland (2014). Data on cannabis use were obtained from state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys; arrest data were obtained from federal crime statistics.

Authors reported: “Decriminalization of cannabis in five states between the years 2009 and 2014 was associated with large and immediate decreases in drug-related arrests for both youth and adults. … The sharp drop in arrest rates suggests that implementation of these policies likely changed police behavior as intended.”

They further reported: “Decriminalization was not associated with increased cannabis use either in aggregate or in any of the five states analyzed separately, nor did we see any delayed effects in a lag analysis, which allowed for the possibility of a two-year (one period) delay in policy impact. In fact, the lag analysis suggested a potential protective effect of decriminalization.” In two of the five states assessed, Rhode Island and Vermont, researchers determined that the prevalence of youth cannabis use declined following the enactment of decriminalization.

Investigators concluded: “[I]mplementation of cannabis decriminalization likely leads to a large decrease in the number of arrests among youth (as well as adults) and we see no evidence of increases in youth cannabis use. On the contrary, cannabis use rates declined after decriminalization. … These findings are consistent with the interpretation that decriminalization policies likely succeed with respect to their intended effects and that their short-term unintended consequences are minimal.”

Thirteen states currently impose either partial or full decriminalization. Nine additional states and Washington, DC have subsequently amended their decriminalization laws in a manner that fully legalizes the use of marijuana by adults.

Source: http://norml.org/news/2018/03/22/study-marijuana-decriminalization-leads-to-decreased-arrests-no-increase-in-youth-use

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

 

Marijuana for Anxiety

Anxiety and Marijuana: CBD, THC, CBD-A All You Need To Know About Weeds Effects on Mental Health

marijuana and anxiety

 Medical Marijuana Can Treat Anxiety

With a global increase of medical marijuana use to treat health conditions, advocates and studies are showing that medical marijuana can be used to treat anxiety disorders. Advocates believe that the chemical makeup of cannabis can be beneficial in treating anxiety, while others argue that it can actually cause anxiety.

Medical marijuana has been used for centuries to treat depression and other medical conditions. More than 400 years ago, cannabis was used to treat depression in India and has since been studied and analyzed to determine the medical benefits and disadvantages for patients. Today, many states across America have legalized the use of medical marijuana, but usage still remains illegal under U.S. federal law.

 

 

When taking a close look at medical studies and results of medical marijuana used to treat anxiety, it’s evident that the chemical makeup, specifically the presence of the chemical compound Cannabidiol, commonly known as CBD, is the main ingredient to treat anxiety. Another compound, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, can prevent nausea and vomiting in cancer patients, but may have a reverse affect on treatment for anxiety.

 

The Chemical Makeup of Medical Marijuana

CannabinoidGraphic

Medical marijuana, or medical cannabis, is the use of cannabis and its chemical compounds to treat illnesses, diseases and improve symptoms.

The cannabis plant has historically been used worldwide to treat illness and health conditions. The American Medical Association and other medical organizations strongly oppose its use for medical reasons, but the American Academy of Pediatrics believes that the use of medical cannabinoids, the natural compounds that make up the genetics of medical marijuana, can be a therapy for a number of medical conditions, but do not recommend use until more research is complete.

There are 85 natural compounds in cannabis, known as cannabinoids, which all relieve symptoms of illness by attaching to the receptors in the brain that look for similar compounds that occur naturally in the human body. Strains of medical marijuana are specifically bred to contain particular levels of each compound recommended for different conditions.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is the cannabis compound that has found to have significant benefits for treating people with anxiety. CBD-rich cannabis can be treated for patients seeking anti-inflammatory, anti-pain, anti-anxiety and anti-spasm affects. CBD does not make people feel “stoned” or “high,” and can actually counteract the anxiety-driven tendencies of THC. CBD is one 85 natural compounds found in cannabis. It is a major element, making up 40 percent of the plant’s extract and has a wider medical benefit than THC.

The other popular compound to treat medical conditions is tetrahydrocannibinol, or THC, and can be used to relax muscles, reduce inflammation, reduce seizures stimulate appetite, lower blood pressure and is an anti-depressant.

The Right Balance of CBD and THC to Treat Anxiety

marijuana

 

Most who use medical marijuana say it helps relieve anxiety, but others say they feel more anxious after using. There are a wide variety of marijuana strains, which have different levels of chemicals that have various levels of the common chemicals – THC and CBD.

Research shows that THC and CBD can have opposite effects when used to treat anxiety disorders. THC is linked to feelings of paranoia and anxiety, because it activates the amygdala area of the brain, which is responsible for fear. On the alternate, CBD counteracts such feelings from THC. Studies show that taking CBD on its own can lower – even eliminate – anxiety.

Most medical marijuana plants are bread to be high in levels of THC, because it is commonly used to treat more popular health conditions, such as cancer, eating disorders and seizure disorders. THC also sells, because it provides a floating, euphoric feeling that most people commonly experience when using marijuana. Strains with high levels of CBD have only recently became popular in medical usage because of the growing awareness of its benefits.

For those looking to treat anxiety disorders with cannabis, treatment relies heavily on the appropriate dose. Research proves that THC begins to raise anxiety levels after a certain threshold is passed. Those using medical marijuana to treat anxiety will need to find strains with high compounds of CBD when purchasing medical cannabis.

Benefits of Medical Marijuana Studies Prove CBD Treats Anxiety

 marijuan studies anxiety dissorders

 

Certain medical marijuana strains with higher levels of CBD have proven to help treat anxiety disorders. The CBD produces therapeutic affects for patients and can also help patients with Crohn’s Disease or glaucoma. Animal studies suggest that CBD present in cannabis lessens anxiety and reduces the severity and frequency of seizures.

According to a study published by the Institute of Psychiatry, CBD proved to offer great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. During the study, animals who had been given CBD experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression in a series of tests, such as swimming and puzzle mazes, than animals who had not been given CBD.

Another study aimed to investigate the use of CBD for treating a social anxiety disorder. The study, published by the Department of Neurosciences and Behavior, Division of Psychiatry, found that CBD was associated with significantly decreased subjective anxiety.

The study states that in the first session, subjects were given an oral does of CBD or placebo. Results suggested that CBD reduced anxiety in social anxiety disorder patients because it is related to CBD’s effects on activity in specific mood-altering brain areas. (PubMed)

History of Medical Marijuana For The Treatment of Anxiety

marijuana stamp history

In today’s world, the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes is a hot topic. It’s very controversial, with many arguing from all sides of the debate. Yet, the use of marijuana to treat health conditions and illnesses dates back centuries.

  • More than 400 years ago, cannabis was used to treat depression and stress relief in India. Specifically, CBD-rich medical marijuana has a long history of being used to treat health problems, including anxiety. The drug’s popularity as a medicine spread through Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Ancient physicians prescribed marijuana for everything – pain relief and even childbirth.
  • In the 18th Century, American journals began recommending hemp seeds and roots to treat inflamed skin and venereal disease. Queen Victoria used cannabis to help discomfort for menstrual cramps. An Irish doctor, William O’Shaughnessy, first popularized marijuana’s medical use in England and America.  He found it to ease the pain and discomfort for nausea in cases of rabies, cholera and tetanus.
  • Yet, the increase in demands to feel the “high” produced by cannabis with stronger levels of THC eventually led to marijuana being used recreationally, as opposed to medically. For many years, marijuana production to increase the levels of THC led to the decrease in CBD levels to trace amounts.
  • The 19th Century increase in usage of morphine ultimately led to the U.S. government introducing the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906, created by the Food and Drug Administration. Although it didn’t apply to the use of marijuana, it caused a major shift in the U.S. drug policy.
  • In 1914, the Harrison Act was created in the United States, which made drug use a crime. By 1937, 23 states had outlawed marijuana.
  • In 1937, the Federal Government passed the Marihuana Tax Act, which made nonmedical use of marijuana illegal.
  • By the 1970s, strong anti-drug policies were in full swing. Yet, in 1996, California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana use. A dozen states soon followed.
  • In 1998, the British government licensed GW Pharmaceuticals to grow cannabis and develop a consistent plant to extract use for clinical trails. GW’s co-founder Geoffrey Guy, MD, was convinced that by using CBD-rich plants, GW could make medicine of cannabis that had little or no psychoactive effect.
  • In 2009, medical professionals began to discover and test new strains with more CBD than THC. CBD-rich strains were generally not available to cannabis consumers across the United States at this time. Studies analyzed CBD-rich cannabis to determine the medical benefits and disadvantages for patients.

Today, many states across America have legalized the use of medical marijuana, but usage still remains illegal under U.S. federal law.

Worldwide, Uruguay became the first country to remove its prohibition entirely on marijuana in 2013.  Colombia and Costa Rica have bills in Congress that would allow for medical marijuana usage. Jamaica recently passed a law to make it possible to supply marijuana for medical and religious purposes.

Arguments Against Medical Marijuana Use to Treat Anxiety

arguments against marijuana

While most studies prove that medical marijuana can help anxiety, some doctors and anti-drug advocates believe it can make anxiety worse. A common compound found in cannabis, THC, is linked to feelings of paranoia and anxiety, because it activates the amygdala area of the brain, which is responsible for fear.

The University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute stated the following in an online fact sheet titled “Mental Health and Marijuana,” based on information from the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre in 2012:

“Marijuana may seem to help ease depression before the effects of the drug wear off; however after that, smoking marijuana may make depression worse. Those who use marijuana have been shown to have higher levels of depression and depressive symptoms than those who do not use marijuana.

“Marijuana can lead to symptoms of anxiety, such as panic, in the short-term, but there is a lack of evidence pointing to marijuana as an important risk factor for chronic anxiety disorders… Again, if someone has a genetic vulnerability or has an existing mental health issues, marijuana should be avoided.”

For those looking to treat anxiety disorders with cannabis, treatment relies heavily on the appropriate dose. Research proves that THC begins to raise anxiety levels after a certain threshold is passed. Those using medical marijuana to treat anxiety will need to find strains with high compounds of CBD when purchasing medical cannabis.

Anxiety Disorders Treated with Medical Marijuana Use

anxiety and marijuana

Anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety doesn’t go away and gets worse over time, effecting a person’s daily activities, job performance and relationships. Most common forms of anxiety disorders are generalized anxiety disorders, panic disorders and social anxiety disorders.

Sometimes, a physical evaluation is advisable to determine if a person’s anxiety is associated with a physical illness. Occasionally, anxiety can be paired with other conditions, such as alcoholism, depression or other coexisting conditions. If other existing conditions exist, a patient should seek treatment for those before treating the anxiety disorder.

Many with a variety of anxiety disorders claim to find relieve from their symptoms of anxiety with use of medical marijuana. Numerous studies have suggested that medical marijuana use can decrease feelings of anxiety. Yet, we’ve only just began studying the benefits of medical marijuana use for those with anxiety, so physicians are not likely to prescribe use to their patients.

Medical Marijuana with CBD can Treat Anxiety and PTSD

When taking a close look at medical studies and results of medical marijuana used to treat anxiety, it’s evident that the chemical makeup, specifically high doses of CBD, is the main ingredient to treat anxiety.

A study aimed to determine CBD’s impact on social anxiety in public speaking showed that those pretreated with a dose of CBD experienced significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort during their speech performance. The placebo group experienced higher levels of anxiety and discomfort. The study stated that CBD holds many advantages over standard social anxiety treatments, such as anti-depressants, due to the quickness of efficiency and absence of severe withdrawal or side affects.

Medical marijuana can help people with PTSD by working with the body’s natural compounds to create a relaxing, reverse effect on the brain. Studies prove that medical marijuana with high levels of CBD provide a therapeutic effect on those with anxiety disorders. For more info you can check Maps latest study here.

Source: http://www.anxietysocialnet.com/ANXIETY-AND-MEDICAL-MARIJUANA

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

Chart: Arizona’s massive medical marijuana market keeps growing

Steady growth has characterized Arizona’s medical marijuana program over the past few years, and 2017 was no exception as the state reinforced its position as one of the nation’s largest MMJ markets.

Arizona’s MMJ program added over 38,000 patients to its rolls over the course of the year – a 34% increase – firmly establishing the state’s medical cannabis market as the third largest in the United States.

Arizona has more than 150,000 MMJ patients.

Sales of MMJ grew right alongside patient counts, with dispensaries moving a record 43 tons of MMJ throughout 2017.

That represents a 48% increase from the 29 tons of MMJ sold in 2016.

Here’s what you need to know about the situation:

  • A young, mostly male patient base forms the foundation of Arizona’s flourishing MMJ program. Residents 18-30 years old account for a quarter of all the state’s registered MMJ patients, and nearly 50% of all patients are under 40. Some 61% of Arizona’s MMJ patients are male.
  • Over 85% of MMJ patients in Arizona are using MMJ to treat chronic pain. Chronic pain is the conditions most often cited by MMJ patients in nearly every state where the ailment can be treated. But the numbers are especially high in Arizona. In the 11 states that publicly release patient counts by condition, the average portion of the patient base using MMJ to treat chronic pain is 62%.
  • Although some have made the argument that Arizona’s young, male-dominant patient base is using MMJ more for recreational purposes than medical, sales have not exhibited the seasonal peaks and valleys seen in rec markets like Washington state and Colorado. But with patient counts rising each month, continual growth in MMJ sales may simply be explained by the ever-expanding patient pool.
  • Arizona has licensed just 130 dispensaries to serve its large, growing market. This has presented an excellent opportunity for out-of-state infused product manufacturers looking to expand their reach. Two popular, Colorado-based infused products brands – Wana Brands and Incredibles – recently announced plans to enter Arizona’s MMJ though licensing agreements and partnerships.

Source: https://mjbizdaily.com/chart-arizonas-massive-medical-marijuana-market-keeps-growing/

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

Marijuana Treatment Reduces Severe Epileptic Seizures

A rigorous study validates a cannabis-derived treatment for a rare, drug-resistant childhood epilepsy

Marijuana Treatment Reduces Severe Epileptic Seizures
Credit: bdspn Getty Images

 

Medical researchers have confirmed what some desperate parents have been claiming for years—that a nonpsychoactive component of marijuana known as cannabidiol (CBD) can reduce epileptic seizures in some children.

Published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the findings stem from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study—the most scientifically rigorous type of investigation possible. “This study clearly establishes cannabidiol as an effective anti-seizure drug for this disorder and this age group,” says principal investigator Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University Langone Medical Center. “It certainly deserves to be studied in other types of epilepsy.”

A total of 120 children and teenagers with Dravet syndrome—a rare disorder marked by drug-resistant seizures that can be nearly continuous in some cases—were part of the study. They were divided into an experimental group, which received the test drug, and a placebo group, which was given a medically inactive compound. Over the course of 14 weeks the youngsters receiving CBD experienced a median number of 5.9 convulsive seizures per month (down from 12.4) compared with 14.1 convulsions per month (down from 14.9) for the placebo group. The new findings are consistent with previous, less-stringent studies of the same drug, a compound called Epidiolex, made by U.K.–based GW Pharmaceuticals. (GW funded the new study.)

As the current paper points out, “interest in cannabidiol for the treatment of epilepsy was generated by media reports of efficacy in children with Dravet syndrome.” The star of many of those reports was Charlotte Figi, now 10, of Colorado, who was having hundreds of seizures a month by age three when her parents decided to treat her with cannabidiol. Unlike the better-known marijuana component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol does not make users high. Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medical use, and the conditions approved for treatment can vary from state to state. Sixteen states have laws that specifically allow the use of CBD to treat seizures.

The Figis treated their daughter with a specially prepared CBD-containing oil, now known as Charlotte’s Web, which is derived from hemp, a type of cannabis containing less than  0.3 percent THC by weight. They reported dramatic improvement. As word spread, more families tried CBD and the positive anecdotes piled up. “That’s certainly one of the motivations for this research,” Devinsky says. He notes there is also plenty of animal model data as well as anecdotes from the late 1800s about Indian hemp, another type of cannabis, that was used to treat epilepsy. And there are even mentions of the approach in Sumerian tablets going back 3,800 years. “The parents added fuel to the fire,” he says, “but that anecdotal evidence was there for millennia.”

All of the patients in the new trial fit the criteria for severe, drug-resistant epilepsy and were taking other seizure medications. Whereas there was a statistically and clinically significant median reduction in convulsive seizures of 39 percent in the treated group, only three of the 52 patients receiving cannabidiol became completely seizure-free. And 93 percent of those patients reported troublesome side effects—including sleepiness (the most common symptom), vomiting, fatigue, decreased appetite, diarrhea and elevated levels of liver enzymes. Eight of the cannabidiol patients stopped participating in the study as a result of the more severe side effects. The study authors indicate some of those issues could have been caused by interactions with other epilepsy drugs. Also, there was no significant reduction in nonconvulsive seizures, which are essentially brief staring spells in which a person is unaware of his or her surroundings for several seconds. The study notes this could be because cannabidiol only affects convulsive seizures or because nonconvulsive seizures “cannot be reliably counted by parents in developmentally delayed children.”

Nevertheless, 62 percent of caregivers in the cannabidiol group said their child’s overall condition improved during the trial, compared with 34 percent in the placebo group. After the trial caregivers of participants in both the placebo and experimental groups were given the option of continuing treatment with cannabidiol in what is called an open-label extension of the study. More than 100 families from both groups took researchers up on the offer.

Sam Riggio, director of operations for Realm of Caring, a cannabis research, education and advocacy group, understands how even treatments with limited benefits can have a big impact on Dravet patients. Riggio and his wife Tara moved to Colorado from Illinois in 2013 when they heard about cannabidiol in a Dravet group on Facebook. (At the time, the hemp supply in the U.S. was spotty. Charlotte’s Web had a reputation as safe and effective for children, but it was only available to Colorado residents.) Their daughter Francesca, who will be seven next month, was having seizures that never lasted less than 15 minutes and sometimes went on for long as 70 minutes. She had her first seizure at six months and at 18 months suffered a severe reaction to an epilepsy drug that left her with profound cognitive deficits. Then her parents started her on cannabidiol. “It wasn’t the answer for her like it was for Charlotte and some of the other kiddos,” Riggio says, “but it provided her enough cushion that she could come off the three pharmaceuticals she was on.” In the years since, while Francesca remains nonverbal with the cognition of an 18-month old, most of her seizures now last less than two minutes and resolve on their own. Her parents have not had to call 911 nor have they had to rush her to the emergency room. “That’s a huge improvement for her quality of life,” says Riggio, who credits the changes to cannabidiol.

Devinsky hopes these latest findings will persuade the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to change its classification of marijuana as a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act, a ruling that hampers medical research and treatment. (Drugs on Schedule I, such as heroin, are deemed by the DEA to have “no currently accepted medical use.”) “To put CBD as a Schedule I drug violates scientific data and common sense,” Devinsky says. He points out that some opiates, which kill thousands of Americans a year, are Schedule III drugs, a less restricted category. “Cannabis is approved in 20 countries for spasms in multiple sclerosis,” he says, “so to say there’s no evidence of efficacy is simply untrue. Those studies came out a decade ago, this study is coming out today. They have to de-schedule this drug. It’s just not fair to the research and clinical communities, or to the patients. It’s medieval.”

Going forward, GW Pharmaceuticals plans to seek U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of Epidiolex in the next few months as a treatment for Dravet syndrome and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, another seizure disorder. No one really knows yet how cannabidiol reduces seizures in Dravet, but Devinsky says the leading theory is that the cannabidiol binds to a receptor in nerve cells called GPR55, modulating the calcium activity and excitability of the cells. He also says cannabidiol has many other effects on nerve cells and that there is much to learn.

For Riggio, a gold-standard, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial will do just fine for now. “It’s exciting because it’s a new option for people who feel like they are out of options,” he says. “And it confirms what we’ve seen anecdotally—and the more data we have to back that up, the more confidence we have to use this sooner and hopefully avoid a lot of side effects that my daughter had to endure.”

By David Noonan on May 25, 2017

Source: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/marijuana-treatment-reduces-severe-epileptic-seizures/
Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

New Arizona Opioid Hotline Will Recommend Treatments — but Not Medical Marijuana

Cannabis might work as a treatment for opiate addiction. A state anti-opiate hotline won’t recommend it

Cannabis might work as a treatment for opiate addiction. A state anti-opiate hotline won't recommend it.

Using cannabis instead of opiates could save lives, studies say, but Arizona’s new opioid hotline for health care providers — and, soon, for the public — won’t recommend it as an alternative.

The free Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line is set to go live in a few days. It will be “one of the nation’s first real-time, comprehensive hotlines for healthcare providers seeking consultation for complex patients with pain and opioid use disorder,” according to a state news release.

But one treatment option the health care providers and patients won’t hear about on the hotline is medical marijuana.

“It’s not part of the protocol,” said Dr. Dan Brooks, medical director for the Banner Poison and Drug Information Centers. “We don’t have any initial plans to talk about marijuana” as a treatment option.

The hotline is viewed as one possible piece to solving a crisis that has caused bodies to pile up at morgues around the country. More people than ever are dying from the abuse of heroin, pills like OxyContin, or synthetic opioids like fentanyl. Arizona alone had 942 suspected opioid deaths from June 15 to February 22, according to the state’s Opioid Epidemic web page.

“Preventing opioid overdoses and deaths in our state needs a multifaceted approach, and the new hotline is a major step forward as it will give medical providers immediate access to experts who can help to ensure safe prescribing and to identify treatment options for patients, which may or may not include opioids,” Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, says in the release.

“No two patients are the same and treatments vary based on individual needs, so we need to make sure we are providing tailored resources to our medical community.”

The state DHS and Poison and Drug Information Centers plan to create new advice for health care providers. Recommendations will include “specific opioid-related information for providers, such as safe prescribing limits for opioid-naive patients, identification of potentially dangerous drug combinations, and chronic pain treatment options,” the release says.

For some patients, the hotline experts may advise the use of drugs like methadone or Vivitrol but not marijuana

Not that the nurses, doctors, and pharmacists who answer the 24-hour hotline won’t talk about cannabis at all.

“If they have questions about marijuana, we’ll answer questions,” Brooks said.”I don’t know anyone who’s advising marijuana as an alternative.”

Yet cannabis, some experts point out, has been effective in treating pain, and could be considered an advisable substitute for opiates.

Studies show that states with medical-marijuana and adult-use legalization laws have seen sharp drop-offs in their opiate overdose deaths. (None of the studies have so far included a look at Arizona’s statistics, it seems.)

Will Humble, former state DHS director and executive director of the Arizona Public Health Association, stopped short of saying the hotline should recommend cannabis as a specific treatment option for specific patients. But clearly, he said, the staff should talk about its potential benefits as an opiate alternative.

Continue reading “New Arizona Opioid Hotline Will Recommend Treatments — but Not Medical Marijuana”

3 Ways Cannabis Helps You Tap The Full Potential Of Yoga

Make sure your body and mind are ready in the first place to be connected, unlocked and upgraded to receive the full effects of this dynamic duo.

yoga

Weed during yoga (or Ganja Yoga/High Yoga), is another intriguing, relatively uncharted aspect of cannabis done right. Somewhat controversial among some in the yoga community, the one thing that most individuals agree on is that cannabis helps push mental and physical boundaries while practicing yoga.

Tapping the full potential of yoga and cannabis

5 reasons why women love weed exercise 3 Ways Cannabis Helps You Tap The Full Potential Of Yoga
Photo credit

With this practice, two of this world’s greatest relaxing and calming practices are united, but some caution is recommended. If your body doesn’t react well to cannabis or doesn’t go well with yoga for that matter, you might want to try easing into it step by step.

Tapping the full potential of this dynamic duo can easily convert to being a classic Clash of the Titans. So, make sure your body and mind are ready in the first place to be connected, unlocked and upgraded.

Research has proven that the physical benefits of yoga are multiplied through the use of cannabis. Benefits like stress reduction, pain reduction, lowering of blood pressure etc. are all bundled with yoga.

Cannabis helps our body to kind of digest these benefits better and quicker. On the other hand, doing yoga while high can help digest (literally this time) cannabis more efficiently.

That optimal absorption of cannabis results in further increasing and lengthening the positive effects of CBD ad THC inside our system.

1. Body and mind boost

What Does Smoking hero 1 3 Ways Cannabis Helps You Tap The Full Potential Of Yoga
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Simply put, yoga promises relaxation, bliss, and spiritual awareness; cannabis helps our body react well to these virtues. The blend of a little bit of cannabis during yoga might boost the ability of our mind to make meaning out of the vacation that is yoga.

The initial toughness and difficulties of yoga positions and movements can be significantly eased through the trademark qualities of cannabis.

2. Short term vs long term

yoga 3 Ways Cannabis Helps You Tap The Full Potential Of Yoga
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We know however great weed’s effects are, they won’t last forever. But yoga is something that has the basic benefit of ensuring our physical capacity not only gets a short boost but a long-term improvement.

Therefore, people looking for the cure of health ailments, like scoliosis, for example, can make great use of this partnership.

3. Boosting your meditation as well

10 add adhd yoga 3 Ways Cannabis Helps You Tap The Full Potential Of Yoga
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Reportedly, cannabis has a great deal of impact in meditation as well. We know that weed can act as a broadcasting antenna wired directly to our brains. It kind of amplifies the quality and speed of feelings and thoughts inside of our brain.

Yoga is an excellent outlet to calm and clean our mind through meditation. And as cannabis also brings a whole lot of the good ‘cleansing’ of the brain with itself, the combination of weed and yoga might be the best joint-venture hitherto unseen.

With all these profits stemming from a pinch of weed in the recipe of yoga, it might be time you tried it yourself. And after you boost your mind and soul with this exercise, don’t forget to ‘boast’ about it in your social circle. Maybe they could also try a bit of the Dynamic Duo.

Source: https://herb.co/marijuana/news/cannabis-yoga

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

 

Senator Calls Out Big Pharma For Opposing Legal Marijuana

A prominent Democratic U.S. senator is slamming pharmaceutical companies for opposing marijuana legalization.

“To them it’s competition for chronic pain, and that’s outrageous because we don’t have the crisis in people who take marijuana for chronic pain having overdose issues,” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York said. “It’s not the same thing. It’s not as highly addictive as opioids are.”

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

“On the federal level, we really need to say it is a legal drug you can access if you need it,” she said.

Gillibrand, in an appearance on Good Day New York on Friday morning, was responding to a question about whether marijuana is a “gateway drug” that leads people to try more dangerous substances.

“I don’t see it as a gateway to opioids,” she said. “What I see is the opioid industry and the drug companies that manufacture it, some of them in particular, are just trying to sell more drugs that addict patients and addict people across this country.”

Legalization advocates have long speculated that “Big Pharma” is working behind the scenes to maintain cannabis prohibition. And in 2016, Insys Therapeutics, which makes products containing fentanyl and other opioids, as well as a synthetic version of the cannabinoid THC, donated half a million dollars to help defeat a marijuana legalization measure that appeared on Arizona’s ballot that year.

Facts!

Numerous studies have shown that legal marijuana access is associated with reduced opioid overdose rates.

Research published this month, for example, concluded that “legally protected and operating medical marijuana dispensaries reduce opioid-related harms,” suggesting that “some individuals may be substituting towards marijuana, reducing the quantity of opioids they consume or forgoing initiation of opiates altogether.”

Marijuana is a far less addictive substance than opioids and the potential for overdosing is nearly zero,” the researchers wrote in the Journal of Health Economics.

Last week, Gillibrand became the second cosponsor of far-reaching Senate legislation to remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act and withhold federal funding from states that have racially disproportionate enforcement of cannabis laws.

“Millions of Americans’ lives have been devastated because of our broken marijuana policies, especially in communities of color and low-income communities,” she said at the time. “Legalizing marijuana is a social justice issue and a moral issue that Congress needs to address.”

Gillibrand is also a sponsor of far-reaching medical cannabis legislation and recently signed a letter calling for new protections for state marijuana laws to be inserted into federal spending legislation.

“I think medical marijuana could be treatment for a lot of folks,” she said in the interview on Friday. “A lot of veterans have told us that this is the best treatment for them. I do not see it as a gateway drug.”

Many political observers have speculated that Gillibrand will run for her party’s presidential nomination in 2020. She and at least two other potential Democratic contenders have already endorsed marijuana legalization.

Tom Angell publishes Marijuana Moment news and founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Follow Tom on Twitter for breaking news and subscribe to his daily newsletter.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2018/02/23/senator-calls-out-big-pharma-for-opposing-legal-marijuana/#524b8b651bac

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Bill requiring testing of medical marijuana for contaminants passes Arizona Senate

Sen. Sonny Borrelli

Howard Fischer / Capitol Media Services

SB-1420

PHOENIX — Sometime next year, medical marijuana users could get a guarantee of sorts that the drugs they are buying are as good as they’ve been promised.

And they’ll know if it has mold, disease-causing bacteria or other adulterants.

With only three lawmakers in dissent, the Senate voted Thursday to require the state Department of Agriculture to test what’s being sold at the state-regulated dispensaries around the state. SB 1420 now goes to the House.

But two other measures dealing with medical marijuana met a different fate.

State Rep. Vince Leach, R-Tucson, was unable to get sufficient votes for HB 2066, which would have allowed state health officials to use some of the money collected from medical marijuana patients in fees for programs to create and publicize messages aimed at youth about the “dangers of marijuana.”

The idea angered state Rep. David Stringer, R-Prescott, who pointed out that voters made marijuana legal for medical use in 2010. He called such an education program “a back-door way to try to tell voters they made a mistake.”

And Rep. Pamela Powers Hanley, D-Tucson, objected to anything claiming there are dangers in marijuana “since it is a plant that never killed anybody.”

Leach had no better luck with HB 2064, which would have barred medical marijuana from being marketed or placed in any package “attractive to minors.” That includes the use of cartoons, images of minors, symbols or celebrities to market to minors, and any design that resembles another product available to children, like candy.

Leach said the idea is to prevent accidental poisonings, saying children have ingested marijuana by mistake, particularly when it looks like candy. If marijuana is a medicine, he said, it should be packaged and sold as such.

“When you buy an opioid, when you buy your cholesterol medicine … it’s not packaged as a gummy worm,” he said.

But Powers Hanley said she feared the language of the bill was too broad and could allow the health department too much latitude in determining what kind of packaging was acceptable.

At least some of that could end up being addressed in legislation crafted by Sen. Sonny Borrelli, R-Lake Havasu City. One provision of SB 1420 requires marijuana products be sold in childproof containers, with the patient’s name and state-issued medical marijuana identification number on the label.

The heart of Borrelli’s bill, however, is the testing that would begin July 1, 2019. The senator said he wants to be sure that people who have been given a doctor’s permission to use marijuana for specific medical reasons are ingesting only what they want and not what they do not.

What is found in testing would have to be disclosed on the label to the buyer.

But the bill also contains what he calls a “quality control” provision, as different strains of marijuana are promoted, at least in part, by the level of THC, the psychoactive ingredient. SB 1420 would require the Department of Agriculture to ensure that what people are buying is “labeled correctly.”

His legislation says if testing finds that the label doesn’t reflect the quality, or that the disclosure does not list any additives or other chemicals, the product has to be returned to the dispensary to redo the label.

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

How Arizona Could Stop Ripping Off Medical-Marijuana Patients, Make Program Better

A bill at the Arizona Legislature would mandate state-regulated testing for medical cannabis, lower patient registration fees, and make other improvements to the 2010 law.

A bill at the Arizona Legislature would mandate state-regulated testing for medical cannabis, lower patient registration fees, and make other improvements to the 2010 law.

        Arizona rips off medical-marijuana patients by collecting fees that are much higher than what it costs for the state Department of Health Services to run the program.

Last year, for instance, DHS could have funded its $11.7 million in expenditures by collecting $5.7 million from patients. Instead, the state agency collected $18.9 million from them. The extra money went into a useless overflow account that now sits at more than $33 million.

“I wish I would have thought about writing the rule to include a variable fee.” — Former Arizona DHS Director Will Humble

A bill co-sponsored by nearly the entire Legislature, Senate Bill 1420, would change the equation. It would bring down the cost of a medical marijuana card from $150 a year to something more reasonable — something lower-income or fixed-income people could afford.

For many people, the best part is that it would also mandate state-regulated testing for mold and other contaminants in medical marijuana.

But would the bill trade the state program’s high annual surpluses for annual deficits that could end up costing  taxpayers?

Continue reading “How Arizona Could Stop Ripping Off Medical-Marijuana Patients, Make Program Better”

Trump administration cautions against hemp expansion

The Trump administration doesn’t want to see hemp expanded nationwide in the next Farm Bill because of concerns about overproduction, an official said Wednesday.

Greg Ibach, undersecretary for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said current hemp regulations are “fairly narrow” and that the Trump administration doesn’t necessarily want to see that change when the Farm Bill is rewritten this year.

The 2014 Farm Bill allowed hemp production for the first time in a generation – but only in states with authorized hemp research projects.

“Opening the door wide open nationwide, with no restrictions, may not be in the best interests of the hemp industry,” Ibach said, providing the most thorough comments yet from the Trump administration about hemp.

“One of the challenges we maybe have in the hemp industry is to make sure that demand and production coincide,” he told the media, including Marijuana Business Daily, after speaking at the Governor’s Forum on Colorado Agriculture in Denver.

Asked how the USDA and Trump administration envision hemp being regulated, Ibach said there’s danger to opening up the market to all states.

“We need to be careful so that we don’t kill the market for hemp by overburdening the market with supply before there is demand for it,” Ibach added.

He said oversight of hemp should belong to the U.S. Department of Justice, which includes the Drug Enforcement Administration, not the USDA.

The DEA appeared in court last week to argue that CBD, a molecule derived from hemp and marijuana, is an illegal drug and not authorized by the Farm Bill.

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Kristen Nichols can be reached at kristenn@mjbizdaily.com

Contact Natural Healing Care Center (click) for more information on Cannabis as medicine, or for any other questions call 520-323-0069

 

Source: https://mjbizdaily.com/worried-hemp-overproduction-trump-administration-cautions-expansion/